To kill a mockingbird essay characters

David Baker: Well, it’s certainly it’s about prejudice, it’s about pride, it’s about prejudgment. But you know the thing that struck me most about it is the universality of traits that are found in all human beings are in this book. Particularly, the fact that it’s a book told through the eyes of a little girl as she becomes a woman.  And I find that very beautiful…‘cause it’s almost biblical in the sense a child, a little child shall lead them.  And I guess I’m also struck by the way that Harper Lee characterized the various players in the book. For instance, the fact that there is that duality that all human beings have that nobody’s essentially all bad or all good. And I thought that, more than anything else, she was able to capture that. And I thought about an ad that I happened to be seeing on TV the other night when I was, you know, going through the book again, and it’s the ad that Kobe Bryant does.  And he talks about, “People hate me because I swagger, they hate me because I score too many points, they hate me because I’m a pro.”  And then when he finishes all of that, he says very quietly, “It’s the same reason that some people love me.”  And I thought about that when I thought about, you know, some of the characters here who are very, very bad, are very evil seemingly in intent. And yet then there’ll be somebody who happens that says there’s something redeemable about them.

Meanwhile, Mr. Ewell threatens Atticus and other people connected with the trial because he feels he was humiliated. He gets his revenge one night while Jem and Scout are walking home from the Halloween play at their school. He follows them home in the dark, then runs at them and attempts to kill them with a large kitchen knife. Jem breaks his arm, and Scout, who is wearing a confining ham shaped wire costume and cannot see what is going on, is helpless throughout the attack. The elusive Boo Radley stabs Mr. Ewell and saves the children. Finally, Scout has a chance to meet the shy and nervous Boo. At the end of this fateful night, the sheriff declares that Mr. Ewell fell on his own knife so Boo, the hero of the situation, won't have to be tried for murder. Scout walks Boo home and imagines how he has viewed the town and observed her, Jem and Dill over the years from inside his home. Boo goes inside, closes the door, and she never sees him again.

To Kill a Mockingbird Lesson Plans contain 139 pages of teaching material, including: To Kill a Mockingbird Lesson Plans Introduction Lesson Calendar Chapter Abstracts Characters Symbols/Objects Daily Lessons Fun Activities Essay Topics Short Essay Questions Short Essay Questions Key Multiple Choice Questions Multiple Choice Questions Key Short Answer Questions Short Answer Questions Key Oral Reading Evaluation Sheet Reading Assignment Sheet Writing Evaluation Form Quiz/Test Generator Download Lesson Plans Follow Us on Facebook About BookRags | Customer Service | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy      Copyright 2017 by BookRags, Inc. FOLLOW BOOKRAGS:

To kill a mockingbird essay characters

to kill a mockingbird essay characters

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