Pantheon architecture essay

References
[1] Marder, Tod A., and Mark Wilson Jones. The Pantheon: from Antiquity to the Present. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2015. E-book.
[2] Kostof, Spiro. A History of Architecture: Settings and Rituals. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985. p217-219.
[3] Platner, Samuel Ball, and Thomas Ashby. A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome . London: Oxford University Press, H. Milford, 1929. p382-386.
[4] "Pantheon Rome." Pantheon Paris. Accessed December 20, 2016. [access] .
[5] Lancaster, Lynne C. Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome : Innovations in Context. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2005. p97-98.
[6] Cowan, Henry J., and Trevor Howells. A Guide to the World's Greatest Buildings: Masterpieces of Architecture & Engineering. San Francisco, 2000: Fog City Press. p24.
[7] Jones, Mark Wilson. Principles of Roman Architecture. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2000. p200-202.
[8] Jones, p204-210.
[9] Stamper, John W. The Architecture of Roman Temples: The Republic to the Middle Empire. Cambridge, .: Cambridge University Press, 2005. p196.
[10] Kostof, p218.
[11] Papandrea, James Leonard. Rome : A Pilgrim's Guide to the Eternal City. Eugene: Cascade Books, 2012. p34-35.
[12] “Pantheon Rome.”
[13] King, Ross. Brunelleschi's Dome. London: Chatto & Windu, 2000.
[14] Fiederer, Luke. "AD Classics: University of Virginia / Thomas Jefferson." ArchDaily. December 08, 2016. [access] .

The Pantheon is the place of burial of the Italian kings, Victor Emmanuel II in the second niche on the right and Umberto I and his wife Queen Margherita in the second niche on left. The great Cardinal Secretary of State Consalvi is memorialized in a monument created in 1824 by the Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen, in the third niche on the left. The tomb of Renaissance painter Raphael is between the second and third niches on the left. The first niche on the left has the tombs of 16th-century painters Perin del Vaga and Taddeo Zuccari and sculptor/architect Flaminio Vacca. The stucco reliefs on the walls of that niche are by 18th-century artist Carlo Monaldi. The first niche to the right of the entrance has a 15th-century fresco, The Annunciation, by Melozzo da Forli.

Moving towards the east and looking up towards the exterior of the cella, a visitor would be mesmerized with the masterful depiction of the Panathenaic procession as it appeared in cinematic fashion on the frieze which was visually interrupted by the Doric columns of the exterior. This was certainly a scene that every Athenian could relate to through personal experience, making thus the transition between earth and the divine a smooth one. A visitor moving east would eventually turn the corner to face the entrance of the Parthenon, and there he would be confronted with the birth of Athena high above on the east pediment , and just beyond it, the arrephores folding the peplos among the Olympian gods and the heroes of the frieze.  Then, just below, the “peplos” scene, through the immense open doors, any visitor would be enchanted by the glistening gold and ivory hues of the monumental statue of Athena standing at the back of the dim cella. The statue of Athena Pallas reflected its immense stature on the tranquil surface of the water-pool floor, and was framed by yet more Doric columns, this time smaller, in a double-decked arrangement that made the interior space seem as if it were even larger and taller than the exterior.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) is a prolific builder of " Latter-day Saint " or " Mormon " temples. There are 157 operating temples (which includes 2 previously dedicated, but closed for renovation), 12 under construction, and 13 announced (not yet under construction). [16] Latter-day Saint temples are reserved for performing and undertaking only the most holy and sacred of covenants and special of ordinances . They are distinct from meeting houses and chapels where weekly worship services are held. The temples are built and kept under strict sacredness and are not to be defiled. Thus, strict rules apply for entrance, including church membership and regular attendance. During the open-house period after its construction and before the temple is dedicated, the temple is open to the public for tours. [17]

Pantheon architecture essay

pantheon architecture essay

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) is a prolific builder of " Latter-day Saint " or " Mormon " temples. There are 157 operating temples (which includes 2 previously dedicated, but closed for renovation), 12 under construction, and 13 announced (not yet under construction). [16] Latter-day Saint temples are reserved for performing and undertaking only the most holy and sacred of covenants and special of ordinances . They are distinct from meeting houses and chapels where weekly worship services are held. The temples are built and kept under strict sacredness and are not to be defiled. Thus, strict rules apply for entrance, including church membership and regular attendance. During the open-house period after its construction and before the temple is dedicated, the temple is open to the public for tours. [17]

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