Essay closing paragraph

For some expository and argumentative essays, it’s appropriate to end with a call to action as your last sentence. For example, if you’re writing an informative essay about the sea creatures that live in the very deepest parts of the ocean, you may close with a sentence like this: “It’s clear that today’s scientists should continue to observe and document these mysterious creatures, so we may all learn more about life at the bottom of the ocean.” A call to action like this can make your reader feel inspired and informed after reading your essay.

It is important to remember that this is a rough sketch by which to write your essays. If your topic is quite complicated, then you may have infinitely more evidentiary paragraphs than three. Furthermore, you can expand your individual themes, as well. You can write two or three paragraphs in support of "theme 1" (or Body Paragraph One). The most important thing to remember here is consistency. If you have two or three paragraphs in support of one piece of evidence, then you should have the same amount of paragraphs in support of all sequential facts.

Depending on the guidelines that your school provides, the formatting of your essay will differ, but there are a few things your paper will always need. If you used other people's work in your definition essay, you will have to cite it properly. Remember to include footnotes, end notes or in-text citations. Also, you will need to have a bibliography or works cited list at the end of your paper. Your teacher or professor may also want you to annotate your works cited list by writing a couple of sentences about each of your sources and how they contributed to your essay. You will likely also have to provide a title page with the title of your essay, your name, date, class and instructor.

Essay closing paragraph

essay closing paragraph

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